Routine Friday, Finally!

After about ten days of having our life kind of iffy and upended, we’re starting to our newer normal. The Babe can drive again after the fall from the ladder and brain bleed. Tuesday is the CT Scan and followup with Neuro Doc. We don’t expect any surprises. Just want to be able to mess around with my flowers and enjoy the deck or patio, depending on the time of day. And blogging in the morning! Yes, I’ll welcome that.

After the last year and a half, there is no normal, in my opinion. Not anymore. Our life was changed forever with the pandemic. I think in general, we were overly confident about illnesses, and COVID changed all of that. We had our shots, but I fail to believe we’re safe when so many won’t get vaccinated. All we can do it do what we feel is right. I believe the masks are still needed, despite many state leaders trying to access vacation dollars for their meager budgets after a year of coming up short. Time will tell.

My reading today was perfect. The Epitath of Alexander the Great reads:

A tomb now suffices him for whom the whole world was not sufficient.

If you recall, Alexander the Great was one of the most famous generals through all of history. He conquered many lands far from his kingdom of Macedon, which was part of the Greek Empire. He conquered most of the known world in his life.

For a man who had to explore and conquer, always coming out on top, a small grave would have never been enough. It makes me wonder if he was ever educated about the things in life that really matter. Of course, the life was nothing like today, after over 2,000 years of Civilization. But I’m sure he had comforts available to more than the average man. Being a king had certain perks.

In the last couple of years, since I started writing (and studying how to), I’ve given a lot of thought to how I want to spend my time for the rest of my life. I’m hoping the rest of my life with give me until in my 90s at least, with my brain still functioning, and my body systems still working. Things like sight, hearing, working with my hands on sewing and needlework, all require a steady hand and fair eyesight.

What may your epiteth read like? I used to think I’d like to have, “She had CLASS,” written on the stone. That is in reference to my Aunt Anna’s comment, “It’s got class, kid.” Whe was a very refined lady as was Gram Jewell. They lived together all of their lives, and Anna worked at the phone company. She wore very beautiful dresses, many from a high end store at the time. She had Class. I wanted to learn that, too. I came to know it meant more than material possessions. It was part of being a lady. My dad always told me, “If you can be one half the lady your mother is, you’ll be fine.” That was at a time when Mom was happy with her life, before she became unhappy, felt trapped, and became an alcoholic. I transferred the “lady” example to Aunt Anna and Gram. Gram is my hero anyway, and she is who I’d like to be like. I’m striving, trying.

My epiteth may read, “She had Class. And a loving heart. A caring soul. She loved her children, husband, grandchildren, and she loved to create. She wrote about hard things. She shared hard times. She shared prayers that helped her keep her sanity. She slowly learned to stand up for herself. She slowly learned to set boundaries. She learned last to take care of herself, as she did for others. She loved her God, and always felt safe in His hand. She knew He would guide her, all of the days of her life.”

And I hope to have no further Adventures of the Babe that include ED physicians, falls, CT Scans, and scares for our family and friends. Give me nondescript days from now on. I can create my own excitement through writing, thank you very much. And hopefully, you’ll all keep with me on this journey. See you early again tomorrow! Thank you for reading.

Thursday Thoughts

One of the most impactful things Dad ever taught me is to look at things from every different angle you can before deciding on something. In most things, it is prudent to do so. I like that he would tell me to think of where the other person may come from. It has always served me well. As young kids, they expected us to think things through. They, meaning the parents, teachers, coaches, etc. Maybe we didn’t have a stress-free life as kids, but I think we all can operate as reasonably intelligent adults.

Sometimes, someone may remark, “Gee, I didn’t think of it that way.” That’s a clue you may have opened their eyes to a fresh way of thinking. It’s easier if they’re open to changing their way of doing things. If they’re not, it’s much harder. Consensus is easier to achieve with more open-minded people. Face it. Change is hard. People resist as long as they can.

It gets frustrating when someone digs in and belittles your decision or choice and later claims they supported you all the way. The excuse is “Well, things were different.” With some people, it’s just not worth being right. It’s best to know you are and move on. I’ve had to do that a lot about a lot of things in my life. Moving away to a different neighborhood is a big deal in my family. No more, because I’ve done it. Three times. Mom still lives in the same house she and Dad purchased in 1949. That’s seventy-two years in the same house. It has to be some kind of record.

Photo by Ivan Bertolazzi on Pexels.com

We have to learn to be comfortable with our decisions. We need to accept full responsibility for the consequences of our actions. All of them. We have a responsibility to admit if we do something bad. Or good. We sometimes learn more from the poor decisions than the good ones. It’s possible. A balanced person never forgets the lessons they learn from the poor ones. And they know not to beat themselves up over them.

I had another Zoom call with Sam, my book coach today. I’m eager to add more description to my second chapter and flesh out the first scene of the third chapter. Slow and steady wins the race. I read something a couple days ago stating it takes three years to write a book. At first I scoffed at that. *Word of the Day – Scoffed! When I think of starting a year ago, January 2019, it’s not so off the mark. That’s about what I’m looking at now, at the current rate. I do like having smaller sections to rewrite.

I have about 40K written in my first book, These Walls Do Talk. I want to finish it someday I see it as a part of a trilogy. It’s not lost work it was good practice. I think back to a conversation Sam and I had once that touched on having manuscripts that will not be the ones to publish. It’s a very common occurrence among writers. That does not surprise me. Among quilters, there are many projects that never see the quilting and binding added. I have a beautiful example of one. I did not finish the first quilt ever made. I kept it as a reminder of how it was to just start learning the craft. The most important thing I learned was the famous quarter inch seams are to be critical. Otherwise, nothing will align properly. I have some rows that look terrible. You can fudge on a seam while dressmaking (I have frequently), but in quilting its unforgiving. Come to think of it, I should put a binding on it and drape it on my studio chair right here. It will remind me there is a learning curve with everything creative. And to be humble.

Goldie Could Enjoy My “Humility” Quilt.

I think I should dig that quilt out and finish it. Just because. I can look at as a failure. I don’t like the colors. It was a practice piece. I can also use it to help me see how much I’ve learned. All the quilting skills I have are self-taught. There were a few classes I took, but most of it is self-taught. With lots of books and magazines.

I’m glad to know how to look at things differently. It’s helped me be grateful, despite having a body ravaged by some weird ailments. I could have become bitter about what I lost at age 44, but I am grateful for what I can still do independently. I am grateful to have a husband who tells me, “whatever you want to do, honey,” when I have an idea for another quilt, blog, or project. We work well together, he encourages me. It stifles a lot of women to have little support for their creativity. My only problem is finding the time to do all the things I’d like to do!

Have a beautiful day. Enjoy the precipitation we’re having in Gretna, NE. I wish those fires in Colorado would have a gully washer fall on them. The destruction is terrible. Be Open. Think Differently. Love Without Restriction. Be Safe. Be Kind. Be Careful.